The Gear Journal

Tom Bihn Strap Keepers

Read More

You know all those annoying dangly straps on your backpack? Don’t deal with that shit… Seriously…

This is the answer.

Details.

GORUCK Wire Dopp

Read More

Ask anyone in the industry what the best tech pouch is and 99% of them will say it’s the Peak Design Tech Pouch. I can’t really argue against that either… It’s made beautifully and is just a really smart design. That said, I don’t often carry enough tech with me to warrant such a large pouch and hate to give away empty space in my bag.

So… What are my options? While the GORUCK Wire Dopp isn’t nearly as sophisticated in design or fabrication, it’s absolutely perfect for me. I use two and sometimes 2.5 wire dopps to organize things like my cables, chargers, batteries, hard drives, and other gear. The best thing about them is that they sort of form to whatever it is that is inside them – giving you space back in your bag.

Plus, GORUCK…

Details here.

The Wotancraft Pilot Bag

Read More

I’ve mentioned in the past that I own and love the Peak Design Camera sling. The only thing that bothers me about the bag is its modern aesthetic and try as I might, I just can’t get over it. So rather than pocket my vanity, I decided to make a move and try another bag – The Wotancraft Pilot.

Essentially, Wotancraft is a workshop that was created in 2009 in Taipei City. The idea was to create every day camera bags inspired by vintage military designs, but with modern conveniences.

A few years back, I bought a Wotancraft Scout for a friend of mine as a gift. It was an expensive ($350) bag with incredibly rich details and a built quality that can only be described as perfect. To put it shortly, the bag was very obviously handmade by someone with a shit-ton of passion for making bags.

Anyway, I fell in love with that Scout and it made sense to try Wotancraft again – only this time, for myself.

Enjoy the video… and if you need more details on Wotancraft, click here.

Filson Original in Camo

Read More

Filson just released an old bag in a new color way. It’s the traditional briefcase in a sort of Wes Anderson style camouflage and I totally dig it. These are the types of bags you buy once… and then use it off and on for the rest of your life. In fact, I still own and use a Filson bag that my dad bought in the 1970s…

Details.

Pioneer Matter Bifold

Read More

I promised an update on my Pioneer purchase a few months back and here I am… I’ve been using the Matter bifold for 6-months now and have come to the conclusion that it’s the best wallet I’ve ever used. A few reasons:

  1. The 10XD material is very light, very thin, and feels as though it wouldn’t last longer than a couple of days in your pocket. In reality, my wallet still looks as good as it did the day I got it. This shit wears well.
  2. The size and organization is perfect. I’m a front pocket guy, so my wallets have to be small. This one is and has just enough organization to ensure it stays that way.
  3. Along those same lines, the design is perfect. There isn’t a single slot that is hard to get too and all of Pioneer’s design decisions work well together.

The only real question left is long-term durability. I’ll keep ya updated.

Details.

Peak Design Everyday Sling – 6L

Read More

I was sent this sling bag about 6 months ago, but wanted to use it before doing a brief review. Essentially, the 6L Everyday Sling is a small cross shoulder or “ass pack” bag designed primarily for photographers. It’s built beautifully and comes in a few different colors. I got black.

The Pros:

  1. Like I said, it’s built incredibly well… Something I’m starting to expect from Peak Design after recently getting one of their straps.
  2. It carries more than it’s size would suggest. In mine, I carry a Leica Sl2-S with 35mm Summicron V4 attached, a Leica M7 body only, a 21mm SEM, a 90mm Summicron, and various accessories such as batteries, filters, etc…
  3. It’s minimal. There aren’t many pockets or flapping straps to distract you. In fact, it’s basically just a pouch with a very configurable strap.
  4. Due to this strap and they way it pivots off the bag, you can wear this bag as a sling, an over the shoulder bag, or even a fanny pack.
  5. And no matter which way you chose to carry this bag, your camera and lenses are remarkably accessible.

The Cons:

  1. After using this bag for a period of time, I can really only thing of one con. The Everyday Sling doesn’t look like a camera bag in the way that maybe a Domke would (which is a good thing), but I’m still not hip on the aesthetic. I think that maybe it’s a bit too modern in appearance for me?
  2. Oh wait… one more con. The front quick stash pocket? It’s too tight to be useful for anything accept maybe a lens cleaning cloth.

End of the day… If you are looking to carry small and light, the Peak Design Everyday Sling in 6-liters is hard to beat. It’s also offered in 3 and 10 liters.

Details here.

Dango Carry All Lite

Read More

I try not to show my age, so I never wear shit on my belt… but this is an interesting concept and given that it was made by Dango, it’s prolly made pretty well too.

Details.

Peak Design Slide Light

Read More

So yeah… I have a SL2-S now… Damnit. And that brings me to camera straps. Traditionally, I’ve always preferred very simple straps with no adjustment, no bells, no whistles… In fact, I usually just make my own out of a bit of leather. This gives me a custom and very sleek strap that fits perfectly.

The one problem with this is that to remove the strap, you have to go through the whole split ring fiasco with your fingernails. And if you like to move straps from camera to camera, this is a real pain in the ass.

Enter the Peak Design Slide. It’s not cool looking… at all… and it doesn’t feel right to put one on a classic rangefinder, but from a functionality standpoint, it’s really hard to beat.

Essentially, the slide is a quick release strap that can go from camera to camera in seconds with little effort. Plus, it’s actually exceptionally comfortable.

Details.